Thursday, June 7, 2007

ArtsHab in the Core, June 7 - July 4, 2007

As the impending (and seemingly ongoing) end for ArtsHab continues, residents and friends have gathered for a group exhibit focused on the impact our city's economic boom has had on the visual arts community. That message isn't quite clear as you peer into each individual piece, many of which are older works or the artists' personal favorites; what is clear is that as a whole, these artists have been able to live and produce work within a stable environment, both functionally within these studio spaces and idealistically as an incubating community--a community from which they can live, work, and continually feel inspired and supported.

For this exhibit, many of the artists included short bios of themselves and their thoughts on the city, and this small gesture reveals a deep and much needed glimpse; hitting home that if and when ArtsHab closes, it's not just a loss of another art studio space, but the dispersal of individual talents and the destruction of an entire community.


Artists: Ashley Andel, Ryan Brown, Jeff Collins, Pieter de Vos, Roger Garcia, Gabriela Rosende, Shane Krepakevich. Beth Pederson, Lynn Malin, Tristan McClelland, Tessa Nunn, Harold Pearse, Tim Rechner, Jenna Stanton, Greg Swain, Will Truchon, Arlene Wasylynchuk and Amanda Woodward.

8 comments:

MC said...

Amy,
Are you handy with a camera? Pictures from the shows you cover would be a great addition to your blog.
I wish there were images of this show up, so one could get an impression of it... I'd bet some of the artists might even have jpegs they could send you.
I know, I'm pushy... just a thought.

amy said...

I think about photographing the shows I go to, but that adds an entirely new layer of documentation--one that I'm not sure I can commit to yet.
I have documented once (Make it Not Suck, Jasper Ave), but I was there for that very purpose. chasing down photos takes a while, and I prefer to post soon after each opening. if artists have low-res web ready images they want to send me of their work, I'll gladly post them after the fact (however, I can't guarantee I'll post them every time).
photographing the openings is something I think about, but I like to keep a low profile . . .

MC said...

Low profile seems reasonable... besides, if you take/post a picture of somebody's work, and they think it's a crummy representation of the work, they might be miffed (also, I suppose there's copyright issues perhaps, etc.).

With most shows you cover, I'm sure either the gallery, or the artist, would likely have a shot or two, digital, that you could get via email or whatev., and whack up here. It'd be easier than shootin' 'em yourself, anyway.

Maybe, if you do photograph at the openings, the pictures would be better off describing the event, rather than the work... shots of beautiful people enjoying an art show always look good... make the scene seem lively...

af said...

exactly. I'd rather cover the event and the people and something about the night than just shots of the work, which the gallery/artist always has the option of supplying. but again, I would only do candid shots.

as for artshab, if you want to imagine, the shots I would have liked to have taken would have been the bio tags, the plate of cut up vietnamese sandwiches, and the silouettes in tessa's studio.

Jillian said...

Amy, I would have taken shotz of you eating mini sandwiches...
Perhaps you should be taking me with you to the openings.

af said...

good thing you shoot on digital, because there were a lot of sandwiches . . .

but if people have photos from openings, which I know they do as there are always cameras and flashes, I would consider posting them.

Amanda said...

Hi Amy! Love this blog...
Just letting you know I am also in this show (Amanda Woodward)

Anonymous said...

This show was sad and even sadder because it was not about the art and just about a self promoting site for work.

In total I saw more shitty work than good work.